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#CHARACTERSTUDY ft. Maya Samaha and Nick Rasmussen


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


#CHARACTERSTUDY is a visual-first dialogue in which Creatives capture and translate unique characteristics of each other. Through the conversation they become co-creators of the final images exploring the intersection of perception and self-expression.


In this conceptual shoot, photographer Nick Rasmussen captures multidisciplinary artist and model Maya Samaha rocking three signature hairstyles and outfits, turning the final imagery into a manifestation of the different identities that one’s self can embody. A dialogue about self-expression and revelation that started on set using a visual language is continued in this interactive free-flow of ideas, where Rasmussen and Samaha discuss their creative journey and experiences.


This interactive interview is comparable to an organic conversation, generated solely by the interviewees with no editor involved.



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


MAYA SAMAHA


This shoot came together in a lot of unexpected ways! My first impression of Nick’s work was “wow, so he’s a cinematic genius”. I was really amazed by his lighting and the cameras he used. Takes a lot of knowledge and skill to shoot the way he does! The style is also unique from most photographers I’ve shot with, especially in LA. Felt like a piece of art within a photo, I could see the artistry in his work and it made me stoked to explore that world with him and also add to that with my own artistry.


I used to be a hairdresser, from 18 to 23 years old. That was one of many of my jobs at that time. The day of our shoot I decided to incorporate some wigs which I ended up cutting & styling myself. Definitely thankful for that skill I have, it never leaves me. I think a lot of my previous careers & skill sets have contributed to the times I am on set, whether that’s being a model, director, artist or actress. Every element of who I am and what I bring to my artistry has everything to do with my background of having way too many skills that I didn’t think would still be useful for me today, but they absolutely are.


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


Nick, when did you first start exploring with painting, art, photography, lighting, and where does your inspiration come from? What fuels you to tell your story through your art?



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


NICK RASMUSSEN


Thank you for the love! I am so grateful for this shoot to have come about, I had been wanting to work with you for years, you’re such a unique presence and I think all of your personal history is really worn on your sleeve and really creates such a rich, magnetic energy.


Since I work mostly out of my home, it's interesting to hear how someone who comes over and takes everything in can be informed on what I’m about and what I’m doing with my work. I started painting last year, but it’s really just something to do when nothing else is going on. I started a way to connect with my dad who was a painter and passed away a few years ago. I enjoy the process, but it’s just for fun. I tend to just stick the paintings into whatever closet has room for them and forget about them. I made my first backdrop about 4 years ago, because they are pretty expensive to rent, and costs a fraction of the price to just make your own. Those are fun to make because it’s such a large project that takes your whole body to produce. It’s therapeutic.


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


I’m interested to hear about your relationship with being so multifaceted, and how you balance your focus and energy on different art forms. Do you find that one of them has your heart more than the others? In Greek mythology there’s the story of Paris of Troy being given a golden apple, and he had to choose one of three goddesses to give it to, knowing that the other two are going to be pissed at him for not choosing them. I feel like a lesson that keeps getting drilled into me is that to excel and be a master at something, I have to dedicate my life to it, as painful as it may be to not see what’s down the paths not chosen. Do you think that’s limited thinking?



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


MAYA SAMAHA


Hearing about your journey with your art and about your father passing makes me really understand so much about you, and I’m so grateful you shared this with me (I cried). My heart is with you, I share some heavy father wounds which definitely motivates me and my work as well.


To answer your question, I don’t think it’s limited thinking, it is definitely a strong way to go about your craft. I think there’s many motivators to why we make art. Becoming a master of something takes a high level of discipline & dedication. If that’s your goal I think that’s incredible and you will absolutely do that, and you already have in many ways.


I think depending on who you’re trying to prove yourself to or receive recognition from can have you working towards that one skill your whole life. As artists will we or it ever be good enough? Who will tell us we have mastered it, if not ourselves? I think we are never satisfied, that’s the curse of the artist. But I can look at you and your work now and say you’ve mastered a lot. I think we need to acknowledge each new level we get to as mastery, and celebrate our new heights as artists.


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


It takes a level of vulnerability to share the art we make and share parts of who we are through our art. What are some parts of you that your art does not show, and what does your art say about you the most? What things have you learned about yourself throughout your journey of making your art?



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


NICK RASMUSSEN


I love that outlook! I definitely have deep respect for people who treat their way of life as their art form. I feel like you probably have many little rituals you perform throughout your day that keep you connected to that inner artist. And cheers to the fathers in all their complexities. The men who came before us I think had some major wounds handed down to them without having many examples of a healthy identity of a man to turn to for guidance or initiation into their own adulthood. I've been thinking about that a lot recently.


I am glad you're asking about the vulnerability it takes to put ourselves into our art, this is another thing I feel like I've been trying to focus on. The more I'm able to put myself into my images, the more people are able to connect with the core of my body of work. I think for a long time I've felt there are parts of me that shouldn't be shown, or have thought that I need to appear more like the people who I see have been able to achieve a level of "success" that I would be striving for. But what works for someone else isn't going to work for me, because it's not authentic to me. If I can continue to figure out ways to share myself in my work, my ideas, my insecurities, my pride, my beauty, my sensuality, anxieties, interests, passions, flaws, etc etc etc. The things that make up my unique DNA, and stop trying to hide parts that I think people will reject, then I really have a shot at being great and creating work that speaks to the human experience. It's like once I have the courage to show the good, the bad and the ugly, then I've achieved my final form. That's when every facet of my life has an opportunity to flourish, my work, my relationships, my family life. It's taken so much work to stop tearing myself down.


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


Do you feel like there is a part of your personality that ties all your work together? My read on you is that there is a confidence and playfulness in you that pushes you to create amazing things to the best of your ability while not taking yourself too seriously, and being able to laugh about everything along the way. I think our photos show that in spades!



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


MAYA SAMAHA


This made me smile and cry!!!!! Hahahaha I’m loving learning so much about you.


You know what’s funny and also interesting. I find so many dope artists who I admire and look up to for their work, and most of their work is “serious” or strong and not based on their humor, tend to be the absolute funniest humans I know!!! And these funnier sides of artists are rarely shown and imagine how funny the world would be if we showed that side of ourselves.


Because we all know art comes from pain but humor does too and I’m deeply depressed half the time so my ass has to make me laugh or else I’m crying lol!!! I grew up with an absolute clown of a mother, she was a performer as well. So when times were rough or turbulence was occurring she would put on literal shows for me and my brother and make us die laughing. She didn’t take herself seriously, and I definitely enjoy that mentality and take that with me everywhere I go, especially on set. Comedic relief is always appreciated, in every room!


Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


My last questions to you are do you make yourself laugh? What’s your humor like to you? What are the ways you make yourself laugh and feel joy on your day to day? Also, what’s the best thing you’ve eaten recently or in your life!



Maya Samaha photographed by Nick Rasmussen for GAHSP #CHARACTERSTUDY


NICK RASMUSSEN


These days I get my laughs from a couple friends who share some decent memes. Recently I got crazy into baking chicken, it’s all I want to do, all I want to talk about. Thighs, skin on, bone in. That's all that matters. I made a chicken burrito at home the other day that brought a tear to my eye.



Featuring: Maya Samaha

Photography: Nick Rasmussen

Styling: Julia Horvath

Wardrobe: NO.ERRORS, DREAMHOUSE



Written and Formatted by Julia Horvath

Image Courtesy of Nick Rasmussen and Maya Samah



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